#SippyTimeReview – @HeavySeasBeer, Hoegaarden, @RodenbachBeer and Steenbrugge

Steenbrugge Tripel

Steenbrugge Tripel

Heavy Seas BeerCutlass Amber Lager – This beer ended my night of drinking as I had all four of these beers in one evening. Because I do these reviews in alphabetical order though, it’s first. This beer got downed while waiting for some chick pea curry at Explorer’s Club, which is fantastic. It wasn’t overwhelming in taste. It was a lighter amber that didn’t go heavy handed on the malt despite the name. It was right in line with a Vienna style lager. This beer has won a number of awards at the Great American Beer Festival and is their second highest selling beer. Heavy Seas is out of Halethorpe MD. They are kind enough to provide a beer finder so figure out if you can drink this one, you scurvey dawgs. I had to make one pirate reference.

HoegaardenHoegaarden – We went out with some friends one evening and because of the draft menu at Hal & Al’s, I decided to make it a Belgian beer night. First up on the list was this beer which I first drank when I moved down here to Columbus. I haven’t had it much between then and now because I drank too much then to pay for expensive beer but with so many choices now, I hadn’t tried it until that night. This beer is a white ale which is a brother to hefeweizens. This beer has all of the hallmarks of a hefeweizen which is orange peel, coriander and herbs along with a murky look to the light yellow color. I’m not sure what the herbs are because the orange and coriander are far more prominent. I remember being surprised by the difference in flavor profile then but now it’s expected. Because of a difference in expectations, this “500 years of hard work” for this beer seemed just okay amongst it’s brothers in the hefeweizen family.

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#SippyTimeBeer – Learning On The Job

english pub

So I wondered why 21st Amendment was excited to tout their beer as a session beer since it had low alcohol volume. The beer world wanted me to find out because Zauber tweeted a link not long after I posted my review that linked to a story called Session Beer Revolution on AllAboutBeer.com. To summarize the idea behind a session beer, you have to brew a beer that is between 4-5% according to most experts. The low alcohol content allows one to continue drinking for hours on end without getting too hammered. It was a push back because most craft beers which had a high level of alcohol. To me, it was no coincidence that the article made the reference to IPAs which have a tendency to be the highest in alcohol content of any type of beer. To give a quick example from Great Lakes Brewing Company, my favorite beverage from them is Eliot Ness Amber Lager which has an alcohol content of 6.2%. Their seasonal IPAs are Lake Erie Monster (9.1%), Rye of the Tiger (7.5%), Alchemy Hour Double IPA (9.4%) and their standard IPA Commodore Perry (7.5%) are all higher Eliot Ness. The article continues to talk about beers being closer 9-12% area because of the cost of craft beers and the fact that people are looking for more bang for their buck when they buy a more expensive beer.

The article goes on to say that most beers produced are between 5-6% and they don’t know how much this push back will work. I don’t care about the alcohol content. I want a tasty beer no matter what the alcohol content is. I think more people that seek out beers like myself don’t care about the alcohol content either. Let’s find out what you think below. At least I know what a session beer is now. -Kevin

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