Joey Ryan on his release from TNA

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So just recently Joey Ryan was on a show called ITR Live on something called Spreaker, which I am just hearing about now, this very second. What follows below is a recap of that appearance, procured from PWInsider.

It’s largely Ryan politicizing himself in effort to possibly someday get his job back, so if you’re looking for something really truly interesting coming out of his mouth, look elsewhere. I post this to say that Ryan has the size and charisma that WWE usually is looking for in a wrestler. He could be somewhere around Rick “The Model” Martel level in WWE if used properly, to further date myself. And WWE used to make their bones on taking guys that the competition didn’t know how to use properly and turning them into stars. So, there you go Vince. – Dusty

How he got in to TNA:

Through David Lagana. I worked with David Lagana in a few places actually Ring of Honor, NWA Hollywood and then he booked me for Ring Ka King in India. Then he got hired to be a writer in TNA and they were looking for guys. He suggested me to Al Snow and Al Snow saw footage of me and decided to make me a GutCheck contestant.

It kind of happened quickly. They called me up and Al Snow asked if I would be interested and I said yes. He said, “Alright, I’ll see you next week”. There wasn’t anything I had to sit on really.

On TNA GutCheck:

They literally don’t tell you anything. I was the second ever guy to do GutCheck. The first GutCheck was Alex Silva. There was that whole thing where Ric Flair changed his decision on Alex Silva. You see, I don’t know how much of that is really a shoot or not. I think they brought me in particularly to be a “No” because they just needed somebody from the indys to make this seem more legitimate and told “no”. I think that was a work on their part.

I think when I wrestled and I had a good match against Austin Aries, thank God I had to wrestle Austin Aries, then I came in and did my promos and stuff like that, even before I was in front of the judges, they weren’t telling me I was going to get a “No”, but I had a few people telling me things. Like Eric Bischoff and Hulk Hogan came up to me and said, “Hey, we like your look, we think you are good. No matter what happens out there, we want to do something with you hopefully down the line”. They were hinting that I was going to get a “No” vote.

I was already going in there portraying a heel character so I knew going into this that I wasn’t just going to go out there, be told “No” and walk away with my tail between my legs. I’m going to be adamant about it. I was going to be myself, a guy who has been told “No” for the last 12 years by major companies.

After I did that promo, there was talk of me going around. They were saying to themselves, “How can we use this guy?” Before that, there was nothing planned for me.

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Stunt Granny Audio Show #176

This week Kevin and Dusty join forces to discuss the epic February 13 Monday Night Raw Super Show. This show was so super, it pre-empted the dog show to CNBC. Was it worth it? Well, if you missed the show (a show that was trending on twitter, I might remind you), Dusty and Kevin are here to break it down for you and answer that question. What did they think of the cartoony Kane-John Cena-Zack Ryder storyline? (Besides that it was very very cartoony.) What did they think of the Shawn Michaels-Triple H-Undertaker showdown? Were the matches on this show so bad the writers might as well have been slashing their ratings with straight razor? What was actually good about the show? Was it that godforsaken debate thing they did to start the show? Was it anything? You need to listen to find out, and it’ll only be an hour of your measley, pointless time. So listen!

Stunt Granny Audio Show #176

TNA Audio #3 – Bleep you Michigan, Wisconsin is the mitten

Ref Hardy will make a disturbing face at you if you do not listen.

Our intrepid heroes Dusty and Matt continue their slog through everything TNA, this week focusing on the January 26 edition of Impact. Included herein:

-Dusty imagines a Mike Tenay-free universe

-Someone in TNA either thinks that Eric Young is actually funny, or knows that Dusty and Matt hate him and like torturing them with him

-Why TNA needs to either shit or get off the pot when it comes to being a taped show

-Why Sting is an ineffectual authority figure

-An examination of whether even TNA knows what they’re doing with their main event scene right now

And a whole lot more nonsense, and it’s only worth an hour of your time, so you need to download this immediately, or else!

 

Stunt Granny TNA Audio Show #3

Stunt Granny Audio #161

Eric makes a triumphant return as he teams up with Jeremy in this edition of Stunt Granny Audio. The boys discuss the latest happenings behind the scenes of TNA or is it Impact Wrestling. How does the influx of new talent to the talent relations and booking staff matter?  How the hell do you possibly add more talent to the active roster? Did you know TNA has at least fifty active competitors already? Who could they possibly bring in that would matter in the least bit? Just why anyone thinks things will change as long as Hulk Hogan is in charge and he is in charge.  They also manage to talk some WWE with Mason Ryan and his creepy hair. Also, how has CM Punk gotten over the elbow drop? Yeah it’s a short segment but whatever. Check it out!

Stunt Granny Show #161

Stunt Granny Lunch Conversation: Jeremy & Eric, June 7, 2011

Unimpressed Cheeta is, well, unimpressed.

Eric: I had an odd thought this morning. Pat Patterson is going to die someday, probably soon. The Brisco Bros. are dying off. Bruce Prichard is gone, but whatever. Jim Ross isn’t exactly a trusted WWE confidant anymore. What happens when Vince McMahon dies and Hunter and Stephanie take over? Who will the inner circle be?

Jeremy: You are seeing the results. X-Pac. Nash. Flair.

Eric: Yep. Maybe Steamboat.

Jeremy: Only if Flair is there. I can’t see Triple H being that open. OR, no wrestlers and all “writers.”

Eric: See, I think Hunter has enough respect for pro wrestling that he wouldn’t let that happen all the way. He’s seen how well WWE operates when it’s guys like Vince, Cornette, Jim Ross and Pat Patterson leading it, and how it’s been in the shitter with the likes of Brian Gewirtz and these soap-opera writers. Plus, his buddies (Nash, Waltman, Scott Hall if he’s still alive) all have “a mind for the business” like everyone talks about.

Eric: Despite Gewirtz being the head writer of Raw, there’s still a glimmer of old-school thinking with Michael Hayes as the head writer of Smackdown.

Jeremy: Look at Smackdown, though. It is bland as bland can be. Sure the talent is bland, but there is nothing there. It is also the time of year WWE takes off. Apathy. They take a 2 to 3 month vacation after WrestleMania.

Eric: This is true, but I don’t know what to chalk that up to. Because an old wrestler is running it? Or because it’s the B-show that doesn’t get the attention.

Jeremy: B-show shouldn’t matter. You write for excitement. You do the most with what you have. It does not help the crowds are full of stupid kids who can’t pay attention. This is a huge problem: fuckers have attention spans of 3-4 seconds.

Eric: Yeah, it’s not like Prime Time Wrestling back in 1988 was setting the world on fire, when the WWF was marketing to the same age group that they are now.

Eric: Catch-22: Wrestling was at its best, most exciting and most profitable when it was marketed toward 12-17, 18-24 and 25-34. Attention spans were longer, edgier stuff was more allowable and appreciated, and more people had more money to spend. But you don’t get 18-year-old fans without hooking them as 6-year-old fans. And therein lies the rub. (At least Nash and X-Pac know edgy.)

Jeremy: You don’t even have to do edgier. You can get older fans if it is good, hence why adults watch some cartoons. Good stories will grasp any age. You don’t need the swearing and T&A. There was some good stuff in there. Your Jack Swagger criticism is spot on. These guys just do what they are told. He stands there waiting for his line instead of just going to it.

Eric: That’s a good point. A good story with good execution will grab any audience, no matter the medium or method of presentation. I think my dad liked “Ren & Stimpy” more than I did, because it was smart and hilarious.

Jeremy: But the characters need to be at least a little compelling.

Eric: And douchebags like Swagger are not

Jeremy: I can’t name one really. Christian has a compelling story I guess. Punk, as much as I like him , is going through the motions. Del Rio got sidetracked. None of them are interesting. BUT, Dolph Ziggler was real good last night.

Eric: Yeah, he was given the ball (a seat on commentary, where honestly a lot of guys are made or broken), and he ran with it.

Jeremy: I couldn’t tell if he was reading lines though.

Eric: He was reading his Twitter! As he wrote on it!

Eric: So the issue is grand: WWE is in its annual funk, its writers don’t do much to shake that out, wrestlers aren’t given much leeway to help, but when they actually get the ball, like Dolph, there’s a chance for them to shine. And then we get excited. And then… what?

‪Jeremy: The ball doesn’t get spread around though. It is a catch and run off with it. They only own one, if you will.

Eric: Have they ever really owned more than one? How was it that I remember the Patterson days, or the Ross-Cornette days so much more fondly? Are X-Pac and Kevin Nash gonna come in and “buy more balls” for these guys to run with?

Jeremy: Well they had Rock, DX, New Age Outlaws, Foley, and Austin all going strong. There were some to be shared.

Eric: And before that, Hogan, Warrior, Savage, Dino Bravo… oh.

Jeremy: Ric Flair, Sid Justice.

Eric: So I guess given the right cast of characters and the best brains behind them, any wrestling company can survive.

Jeremy: Yeah. Unless you are WCW.

Eric: Or your head writerusso is sleeping with your financiecarter.

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